MEAT N16

 

  • Monday: Closed
  • Tuesday - Friday: 9.30 - 7.00
  • Saturday: 9.00 - 5.00
  • Sunday: 9.30 - 4.00

MEAT NW5

 

  • Monday: Closed
  • Tuesday - Friday: 9.30 - 7.00
  • Saturday: 9.00 - 5.00
  • Sunday: 9.30 - 4.00
pork diagram 
            <p class='map-response'>Neck</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Loin is probably the most tender of the cuts. The Fillet from the loin (the Cannon) is a favoured cut for dinner parties and banquets but will always be very expensive. The Loin can be roasted on the bone, but would need great skill in carving. It would be more common to have a boneless loin which will roast beautifully. If rolled with the bone and cut across the Loin, we get the double loin chop (Barnsley Chop) and when split lengthways along the loin and cut through the joint ('on the sixpense') this is the Loin Chop. Both ways, the Chops are great for grilling and BBQ's.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Lion</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Loin is probably the most tender of the cuts. The Fillet from the loin (the Cannon) is a favoured cut for dinner parties and banquets but will always be very expensive. The Loin can be roasted on the bone, but would need great skill in carving. It would be more common to have a boneless loin which will roast beautifully. If rolled with the bone and cut across the Loin, we get the double loin chop (Barnsley Chop) and when split lengthways along the loin and cut through the joint ('on the sixpense') this is the Loin Chop. Both ways, the Chops are great for grilling and BBQ's.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Fillet</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Fillet comes from the inside of the Loin, running from the Chump to the Ribs and protected by the vertibrae. The Fillet is a soft, lean cut Ideal for everything from grilling or roasting whole or cutting up for stir-fry.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Leg</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>In Pork butchery, it is the hind legs that are considered as the 'Leg of Pork' (the forequarter being the Shoulder). The Leg is a big, round, succulent cut ideal for roasting either on or off the bone. The 'foot' at the end of the leg provides the much prized 'Trotter' which Chefs use for a great many dishes and for producing jelly for terrines or cold pies.  </p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Belly</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The growth in popularity of the Belly in recent times has seen it's financial value become equal to that of the Loin. The Belly, more or less 50/50 meat and flavoursome fats, has many uses. The Rib bones, stripped out, become the 'Spare Rib Chops', or the Belly can be cut straight through the bones to produce meaty strips suitable for marinading and grilling or slow roasting. The boneless Belly is often slow roasted flat or can be rolled with flavourings such as herbs and spices.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Offal</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The strong flavours of the Pigs offal don't make it popular for eating on it's own. However, the Liver and Kidney might be added to a pie or terrine mix. The intestines, on the other hand, are far more important as they provide the majority of our sausage skins.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Shoulder</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>Often known as the 'Hand' of Pork, the Shoulder is a meaty cut ideal for pies and sausages. The Shoulder also has the forequarter Trotter which, as with the Trotter from the hind Leg, has many culinary uses including providing geletinous juices for sauces, terrines and pies.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Head</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Pig is probably the only animal that offers a number of uses for the Head. Historically, the Head might have been de-boned, or partly de-boned, roasted and served at the table. While this isn't a practice much employed today, it remains a delicious option. The Cheeks from the Head form the base for 'Bath Chaps'.</p>

PORK

Pork is probably the most versatile of all British meats. At Meat London we take our Pork very seriously. Good Pork should be a deep, rich pink colour with a thick rim of firm white fat under the skin. Any Pork that can’t produce a decent crackling for the Sunday table is of no use to us.

We source our Pork from Plantation Pigs of West Sussex. The animals are born on the land and spend their life running around the South Downs (not a bad life if you are a Pig). Our Bacon is from the impeccable Blythborough Pork of Essex. We select our farmer/producers carefully because we are confident that their farming and production methods are consistent with our aims of animal welfare and eating quality.

The Pigs that make up our Pork are born to the land and spend their entire lives outside in the fresh air of the countryside. From tiny piglets they play together rooting around for feed of grass and herbs. Their ‘hectic’ lifestyle and continuous activity ensure that they burn off calories causing slower, more natural growth, which in turn ensures a meat with deeper more succulent flavours (and the skin to produce the crackling).