EN2

N16

NW5

 

  • MONDAY: CLOSED
  • TUESDAY - FRIDAY: 9.30AM- 7PM
  • (MEAT EN2 9.30AM- 5.30PM)
  • Saturday: 9AM - 5PM
  • Sunday: 9.30AM- 4PM
lamb diagram 
            <p class='map-response'>Saddle</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Loin is probably the most tender of the cuts. The Fillet from the loin (the Cannon) is a favoured cut for dinner parties and banquets but will always be very expensive. The Loin can be roasted on the bone, but would need great skill in carving. It would be more common to have a boneless loin which will roast beautifully. If rolled with the bone and cut across the Loin, we get the double loin chop (Barnsley Chop) and when split lengthways along the loin and cut through the joint ('on the sixpense') this is the Loin Chop. Both ways, the Chops are great for grilling and BBQ's.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Chump</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Chump is often confused. This is the trangular piece of meat that joins the Loin to the Leg. Cutting through the bone creates a very old fashioned English 'Chump Chop'. This would once have been a cheap cut, but today Chefs have discovered how versatile and tasty the Chump is and the price now reflects this. Removing the bone from the Chump and trimming away excess fat provides a little cushion of Lamb that can be roasted, and would be suitable for two to share, or maybe three at a push.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Leg</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>It is generally considered/accepted that the Lamb has only two legs. Those on the hind of the animal (the Fore Legs being called 'Shoulders'). Like much of the animal the Legs are a very versatile cut. A leg can be roasted whole, on or off the bone, and when de-boned and opened up makes for the popular 'Butterflied' Leg, suitable for grilling and BBQ's. The Legs are the most meaty of the cuts and, providing looked after in preparation, will be tender. It would also be common to saw across the leg, through the bone, to make a Leg Steak.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Shank</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>From the last joint on the leg (knee) down to the foot is the Shank. The Shank is a joint favoured by all Chefs. It is a delicious piece of meat that lends itself to long, slow braising. The result is a tender juicy piece of meat full of flavour, leaving a thick gelatinous stock to make a sitable sauce.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Breast</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Breast is rarely a very exciting cut, but if boned and rolled with a herb stuffing the Breast can be braised or slow roasted and become an intersting treat. The Breast is relatively fatty and would usually be used for mince.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Best End</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Shoulder is the most versatile of the cuts. It is a little more fatty than the Hind Quarter cuts and can be prepared for virtually any style of cooking. If cooking on the bone, always ask the Butcher to remove the 'Blade' bone as this bone lays flat through the Shoulder and creates great waste when carving. A Slow Roasted Shoulder is amongst the greatest of all cooked meats. The Shoulder can be boned and rolled for a delicious cheaper roast and is often cubed for stews. Due to it's fat content, the Shoulder is also a good choice for mincing for dishes such as 'Shepherds Pie'.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Neck</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Middle Neck is the five bone joint attached to the end of the Best End. Whilst a good Lamb would never be particularly tough, the Middle Neck would be a tougher joint. It can be cut into second grade Cutlets suitable for grilling, or they can be used on the bone in stews. The Neck is a similar joint (carrying on from the Middle Neck) and is often cut through the bone and used in 'Irish Stew'. Both joints can be boned out to provide tasty meat for stews, braising or mincing.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Shoulder</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>The Shoulder is the most versatile of the cuts. It is a little more fatty than the Hind Quarter cuts and can be prepared for virtually any style of cooking. If cooking on the bone, always ask the Butcher to remove the 'Blade' bone as this bone lays flat through the Shoulder and creates great waste when carving. A Slow Roasted Shoulder is amongst the greatest of all cooked meats. The Shoulder can be boned and rolled for a delicious cheaper roast and is often cubed for stews. Due to it's fat content, the Shoulder is also a good choice for mincing for dishes such as 'Shepherds Pie'.</p>
            
            <p class='map-response'>Offal</p>
            <p class='map-response-desc'>Most of the Lambs innards are wholesome and tasty and invariably find their way to the table. The Kidneys, Liver and Heart can provide dishes on their own. With a little help the Sweatbreads, Tongue and Brain make interesting fayre and, in some countries (although never popular in England), even the 'goolies' make a tasty salad. Finally, the sheeps intestines give us the skins for smaller sausages such as 'Chipolatas'.</p>

LAMB

With such an abundance of fantastic English Lamb available, we don’t restrict ourselves to one breed at Meat London. Like everything we sell in our shops we aim to ensure that the welfare and husbandry of the animals is the key ingredient. We ensure that our sheep are kept outside on the land to feed on natural feeds, within a natural habitat before being taken to local abattoirs to minimise stress and discomfort.

Our Colne Valley Lambs are predominantly Texel / Blue Faced Leicester mules. The combination of the two breeds offer a good shape with meaty cuts.

The Dorset Down Sheep are often referred to as the ‘King of the prime Lamb breeds’. They are among the oldest of our native sheep breeds producing early maturing Lambs from grass. The Dorset Down breed is ideal for Organic breeding and many extensive farming systems.